Above the Line, Accountability, Ownership, Responsibility, Success

One of my favorite activities while behind the wheel driving to and from the Berkshires is listening to one of the SUCCESS Magazine monthly audio CDs.  This past weekend I was inspired by a segment with Barbara Corcoran on the June 2016 CD.

In answer to the interviewer’s question about some of the worst things she has heard from the entrepreneurs she has invested in, she said that  the absolute worst was “What should I do about … ?”  She made it very clear that there is nothing worse than asking her for help that way.  It is not that she does not make herself available to assist and advise her investees, quite the contrary.  She just knows that “What should I do … ?” is the wrong way to request assistance.

Why?  That particular phrase and its variations demonstrates a lack of Ownership, Accountability and Responsibility (OARAbove the Line of Choice – see The OZ Principle by  Roger Connors, Tom Smith and Craig Hickman) for the implementation and outcome of the advice.  If someone tells you what you should do to solve an issue and things do not go well, you can lay Blame at the other person’s feet (Below the Line behavior).  Or if you don’t implement or botch the implementation of the other person’s recommendation, you can still operate Below the Line by making some sort of Excuse.

So what is the right way of requesting assistance from your advisor?  The answer is a very subtle, but significant change to the phrasing of the request to “What would you do in this situation … ?”  When you ask for assistance or advice using this wording, you are taking Ownership, being Accountable and Responsible for both the implementation and results of the suggestion.  Classic Above the Line behavior.  Sounds subtle but the difference is massive.  Furthermore, the advice you receive is more likely to be well thought out.  And due to your OAR, the results you achieve in solving whatever issue you sought assistance for will be faster and better.  When you operate Above the Line positive results are easier to achieve.  As the old (actually very old) television commercial said “try it, you’ll like it.”

If you wish to delve deeper into living Above the Line of Choice in order to accelerate and magnify your results, my ActionCOACH colleagues and I are ready to assist you.  All you have to do is contact us.

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Accountability, Being an Owner, Communication, Culture, Key Performance Indicators, Management, Marketing

The first speaker of the afternoon on the second day was Chris Cooke of Luv4 Marketing one of the ActionCOACH strategic partners.  Luv4 has enrolled me and many of my colleagues in a social media master class.  In addition, we are able to offer a comprehensive marketing class to our clients via our strategic partnership.  My BFOs from Chris were:

  • Leads generated on the internet will not necessarily be successful if they are directed to a crappy website or landing page.
  • Internet leads will research you online, just like you research companies you are considering doing business with.
  • Your sales process must be revised to reflect the unique methods necessary to maximize your conversion rate of online leads.

Our chairman Brad Sugars wrapped up the afternoon and the BEF with mostly housekeeping announcements and one major BFO:

  • In order to improve your conversion rate, keep an Objection Log. Work answers to your most prominent objections into your sales process and materials BEFORE they arise.

The next two days were devoted to the annual North American Coach conference.  We were introduced to several new strategic alliances.  In addition, there were many speakers addressing best coaching practices and client strategies that worked for our clients.  The following are some of the highlights:

In a session about KPIs, one of my colleagues showed a clip from the movie Money Ball Ball (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGf6LNWY9AI) to highlight using KPIs to overcome biases.  He then introduced the concept of subdividing KPIs into Leading, Lagging, People and Productivity KPIs, which was a BFO for me, having only thought of KPIs in general.

KPI Examples Slide

Balance KPIs Slide

By the way, if you are not familiar with Net Promoter Score, I will cover NPS in a upcoming blog, stay tuned.

In addition, he also had the audience do the following exercise:
KPI Table Exercise Slide
You should too.

Another colleague of mine ran a great exercise based on the ActionCOACH formula for change:

(D x V) + F > R

Step 1 – write out a challenge you would like to eliminate
Step 2 – write out your Vision of when the challenge has been eliminated
Step 3 – rate your Vision 1-10 (btw if your vision is not a 10, rework your vision)
Step 4 – rate your Dissatisfaction with the current situation 1-10
Step 5 – write the consequence of not eliminating the challenge
Step 6 – R – list your top 3 resistances to the changes needed to eliminate the challenge
Step 7 – write out the First Step
Step 8 – Be x Do = Have – write an I Am related to the Being needed to overcome the challenge. (The I Am statement will influence your unconscious behavior related to your DISC)
Step 9 – Four steps to learning – Step 7 moved you from u-i to c-i / what needs to be learned to move to c-c?
4 Steps to Learning Slide
Step 10 – question how DISC is effecting behavior (both yours and your team’s) toward solving the challenge

Finally, another colleague presented a process for creating “I’ll be happy when …” and personal purpose statements.

To create your “I’ll be happy when …” statement

Write your top 2 personal goals
Write your top 2 professional goals
List how you will feel when those goals are achieved

Use your top goals and the above list to Create your “I’ll be happy when …” statement

To create your personal purpose statement

List your 2 most positive and unique skills and abilities
For example: Experience and Insight

List how you demonstrate these skills
Coaching & Mentoring

What does a perfect world look like to you?
 Harmony between having positive impact on many clients and enjoying my 70s with my wife and family

Put all 3 together into 1 statement
I use my experience and insight to assist my clients to build very successful businesses that create many great employment positions in their communities.

 I trust you will find some ideas in this BFO series of blogs that will accelerate your success.  My colleagues and I are available to assist you in implementing the concepts presented in these four posts.

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Being an Owner, Blinding Flashes of the Obvisous (BFOs), Culture, Key Performance Indicators, Leadership, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

The second day of the Business Excellence Forum was kicked off by Shawn Moon Senior VP of Franklin Covey.  Shawn opened with a rapid fire bit of jokes and funny quotes, one of the best was:

“The trouble with quotes on the internet is that it’s difficult to determine whether or not they are genuine.”

– Abraham Lincoln

After that he played the famous video of classical violinist Josh Bell playing his Stradivarius in the entrance to a Washington, DC subway station. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnOPu0_YWhw) Virtually no one stopped to listen.  Shawn asked how often do we see excellence right in front of us?  How often do we engage it?

Other BFOs from Shawn Moon:

  • Interdependence – a draft horse that can pull 1000 pounds alone, two can pull 4000 pounds together / to accomplish more get leverage.
  • “If you want to change your results change your habits, if you want to have massive change, change your paradigm” – Steven Covey.
  • The value of time is the value of life.
  • Clarity is simple, getting to clarity is complex!

Next he spoke about Edward Lorenz’s Butterfly Effect.  He told how:

Norman Borlaug – a Nobel Prize winner, saved more than one billion people by expanding the yield of corn, wheat and rice in arid conditions.  Borlaug was one of the first scientists to join experimental agriculture stations created in Mexico by Henry Wallace, former Secretary of Agriculture and then Vice President of the United States. But …

Henry Wallace – was influenced as a young boy growing up at Iowa State by George Washington Carver, so much so that he developed some of the first hybrid varieties of corn, doubling and tripling per acre yields. But …

George Washington Carver – who became a brilliant biologist was encouraged to study plants, rather than paint them by his art teacher, Etta May Budd.  The question Shawn Moon asked was “how far back can we go?”  And …

“How far will our (your) influence go?”

Next, while on the subject of personal mission statements he flashed this slide

 

While his presentation was about personal mission statements, it does not take a lot of work to apply this to your business’s mission statement.

IMG_7962 cropped

Shawn moon wrapped up with the following by Portia NelsonPortia Nelson Poem

The balance of the morning of the second day was breakout sessions.  Here are some insightful BFOs from the breakouts:

  • Have a scorecard and KPIs for each box on your organization charts, both current and three or five years forward.
  • Another speaker expanded this by encouraging a look at every role within your organization, determine the biggest issue for each role and develop a KPI to measure the solution.
  • No matter the size of your business, it is essential to have a well documented on boarding or orientation process and checklist.
  • Disney gives six weeks of training to the people who take tickets at the entrances to their parks. How much training do you employ at your business?
  • One of my colleagues, a former senior HR executive with a major national retailer, said that they had two counter-balancing KPIs:
    • Average time to fill open positions
    • Six and twelve month retention of new hires.

More day two BFOs to come, stay tuned.

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5 Way Formula, Blinding Flashes of the Obvisous (BFOs), Consistency, Culture, Customer Loyalty, Customer Service, Raving Fans

More BFOs from Day 1 of the 2016 BEF, Troy Hazard continued.

Troy told a story about car salesman who had sold him a luxury car in Australia where he lived before moving to the USA a few years ago. The salesman asked how often he traded cars in, Troy answered about every 4 years. The salesman began contacting Troy about every 6 to 8 weeks, by mail, email, telephone, you name it – when Troy moved to USA permanently the salesman continued kept in touch.  After about 4 years the salesman called to say it’s time for a new car.  Troy told the salesman that he permanently moved to US and salesman continued to stay in touch.  On a family visit back to AU, Troy dropped into the dealer and asked the salesman why he continued to stay in touch, answer … “I sold more than 100 cars to your friends.”  The business question to ask yourself is; How is my business staying in touch with our customers, members, advocates and raving fans? (See the following section – day one BFOs from Brad Sugars – The Ladder of Customer Loyalty).

Next, Troy urged us to always have absolute clarity of where the money/profit comes from.  His example was an electrician who repositioned to being a Total Energy Solution.

Troy also told us about one of his companies that had five salesmen.  Following a typical bell curve, at one end of the curve was a salesman who was only doing about $60,000 in commissions and was way below quota.  In the middle were three salesmen at or slightly above quota, earning $100,000 to $125,000 in commission income.  At the other end of the bell curve was a salesman who was pulling in about $275,000 in commissions.  Troy then threw a trick question at us, asking who he fired.  Most guessed the $60K salesman.  In fact he fired the $275K salesman, explaining that he was disruptive, not a team player, stealing leads from the others, didn’t embrace the company culture, etc.  The business question here is who on your team is not fully engaged with the mission/vision/culture of your business?  By the way, he also fired the 60K salesman.

The final BFO from Troy Hazard was very simple; Change or Die, one change at a time!

 

Our next speaker was Brad Sugars, the founder and chairman of ActionCOACH.  Brad opened with the statement that “Profit comes from REPEAT BUSINESS.”

Next Brad presented the ActionCOACH Ladder of Customer Loyalty.

IMG_7935 small

The first rung of the ladder is Suspect – a target or an ideal customer.

Suspects are moved up the ladder to Prospect via marketing.  Prospects have taken some action; responded to an ad, visited your store, called to ask buying questions, etc.  The BFO here relates to the ActionCOACH 5 Way Formula, “if the Conversion Rate is low, the Target is WRONG!”Prospects are moved up the ladder via sales to Shopper. Shoppers have made their first purchase.  The BFO that Brad mentioned here is “the 2nd purchase is 10 times more important than subsequent purchases.”

Shoppers become Customers when they make that all important second purchase.  This is where you begin to build a relationship with your customer.  Have a consistent point of contact and establish genuine know-like-trust in the relationship.

As you develop stronger and stronger relationships with Customers they can become Members.  Members will develop a sense of belonging.  The sense of belonging must be enhanced by superior, personalized customer service and continued relationship building.  The BFO here is Great Customer Service starts with doing business with those you want to do business with (see Target above).

Continued relationship building and consistent superior customer service will result in your Members moving up to Advocates.  A major BFO here is every customer defines customer service differently, that is why building strong relationships is the KEY.  Advocates will refer their friends and network to your business.

If you consistently deliver exceptional customer service and continue to build relationships, your Advocates will become Raving Fans.  Raving fans will refer all of their friends and their networks to your business.

Whew, this wraps up my BFOs from only the first day of the 2016 BEF.  Stay tuned, there is much more to come.

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Blinding Flashes of the Obvisous (BFOs), Communication, Consistency, Culture, Key Performance Indicators, Quality, Unique Value Proposition, Vision

I must say, the Business Excellence Forum (BEF) gets better each year.  There were more than 500 business owners, executives, team members and business coaches in attendance.  With that many attendees, there were plenty of formal and informal exchanges of ideas and best practices.

This year’s forum had some amazing keynote speakers whose presentations yielded many Blinding Flashes of the Obvious (BFOs).  The following are some of the BFOs that struck a chord with me.  I am sure that some of these will have a similar affect on you.

Our first speaker was world-class branding expert Sally Hogshead www.howtofascinate.com (yes, that is her real name “With a name like mine, I had to be successful.”) discovered a new way to measure how people perceive your communication, through the Fascination Advantage® system. Sally is the author of two books “How The World Sees YOU” and “Fascinate – How to Make Your Brand Impossible to Resist” Before researching the science of fascination, Sally rose to the top of the advertising profession in her early 20s, writing ads that fascinated millions of consumers. The title of her presentation was “How to FASCINATE: From First Impression to Lasting Value”

  • Over deliver in One area – Stop trying to be all things to all people
  • You do not have to fix anything – you do have to accentuate your most valuable areas
  • Avoid your competitive disadvantages
  • Every time you communicate, you are either adding value, or taking up space!
  • IMG_7875 small
  • Sally told of going to an theme park where she saw a ticket booth that sold tickets to two rides.  The orange ticket was for a ride with multiple safety warnings.  There was a long line at the entrance to the orange ride.  The other ticket was green, there were no safety warnings posted about that ride.  Also, the was no line for the green ride.  She went on the orange ride, it was great.  Later, she got curious and went on the green ride.  She found the rides were IDENTICAL.  The business point is the theme park understood their target customer’s value proposition and desire for a little danger.  Do you completely understand what your target customer values?

Our next speaker was serial entrepreneur Troy Hazard, www..troyhazard.com author of several books including “Future Proofing Your Business” and “The Naked Entrepreneur”.  The title of Troy’s presentation was “Purpose, Passion, People & Profits”

  • Always respect the business corrections and cycles
  • There are 4 cycles
    1. Your Revenue
    2. The Economy
    3. Your Industry
    4. The emotional cycle – market sentiment
      • Opportunity occurs where these cycles converge
  • In addition to understanding the value your business brings to your market, you as a business owner, must know what you want your business to do for you
  • Every day Troy asks himself and his team the following two questions:
    1. “What is your greatest success and what can I learn from it?”
    2. “What is your challenge and how can I help you?”
  • The five keys to leadership he learned from being a father (E I E I O)
    1. Engage energetically
    2. Inspire greatness (strive to have tomorrow be better than today)
    3. Evoke conscious thought (give everyone a voice)
    4. Involve everyone (don’t under estimate before you understand)
    5. Organize Yourself first
  • Use your ideal (3 – 5 years from now) organizational chart to challenge your team to become who they need to be to fill the positions above them

This is just my BFOs from about 60% of the first day of BEF.  The best Troy Hazard BFOs are yet to come.  To be continued …

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Communication, Culture, Mission, Planning, Unique Value Proposition, Vision

While working with one of my clients whose medical practice has been growing very rapidly, the subject of maintaining organizational focus and culture came up.  As our discussion progressed I was reminded of a few flip charts Brad Sugars, the founder and chairman of ActionCOACH, presented at one of our conferences.  Brad first drew a two person company with one direct connection between the people. That flip chart looked something like this:Two Connections

The next flip chart showed a three person company that had three direct connections between the people, looking something like this:Three Connections

His third flip chart was a four person company with six direct connections:

Four Connections

Brad’s final flip chart was of an eight person organization showing twenty eight direct connections.

Eight Connections

My client, with a stunned look on her face, saw this and said “No wonder I’ve had so many problems controlling the growth of my business.”

Just to recap:

connections table

The simple formula for this is:

Direct Connections = ((Number of People * (Number of People – 1) / 2)

Using this formula it is easy to see that the level of complexity in a company grows at a much greater rate than the company’s growth rate.

Is your business starting to look a little bit more complex than perhaps you realized?

So how are we to grow our businesses, maintaining organizational focus and effectiveness?  There are four key things you must accomplish in order to grow in control:

  1. Have a clear company Mission, Vision and Culture (MVC) – A strong and clear MVC that is aligned and congruent with your company’s Unique Value Proposition (UVP) is the cornerstone of healthy consistent growth.
  2. Communicate and Educate – You must constantly communicate your MVC and UVP to your team, both internal and external, and to your customers, both existing and potential. You must educate new team members and potential customers about your MVC and UVP and the Why behind them (Read Simon Sinek’s book “Start With Why” for further insight).  And most importantly it is absolutely essential that you eat, sleep and breathe your MVC and UVP.
  3. Plan your organization – Although many like to promote flat organizational models, completely flat organizations quickly lose their effectiveness as they scale up. Thus it is vitally important to plan the organizational structure of your company.  At one end of the scale, completely flat will not allow for effective growth, at the other end of the scale, old fashion command and control will compromise creativity and nimbleness.
  4. Be Proactive – Most companies grow organically, without very much forethought or advanced planning. Too often companies reach the point of no return structurally and fail.  All of my clients have a vision of how their companies will be structured working backward from three to five years in the future.  You should do the same.

My ActionCOACH colleagues and I will be happy to assist you to develop your MVC, UVP and Organizational Structure, all of which will prepare your business for exceptional growth.

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5 Way Formula, Communication, Delegation, Effective Delegation, Goal Setting, Leadership, Mental Strength, Mindset

Effective Delegation – Step 1

I’ve been rereading “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People” by Stephen R. Covey.  In 7 Habits, an important distinction is made between “Gofer Delegation” and “Stewardship Delegation.”  I realized that in my ongoing series of blogs on the subject of Effective Delegation I failed to make clear that the series is focused solely on Stewardship Delegation.

Aside from deciding to actually begin delegating and having a plan as to what items to delegate, the first step in delegating any responsibility under Stephen Covey’s and my definition of stewardship delegation is defining and communicating the Desired Result.  Once the desired result is clear and understood by both you (the delegator) and the person you are delegating to (the “delegatee”), they are enabled to take responsibility to deliver that result.  It is up to the delegatee to determine how the methods that will be implemented to deliver the desired result.  This mutual understanding of the target is the foundation upon which leverage and success is built.

 

A Strong Reference to an Article (and Book)

In the January 2016 edition of “Success” magazine there is a wonderful article by Amy Morin entitled “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do excerpted from her book of the same title.  Here are the headlines, please read the article or the book for the details:

  1. Waste time feeling sorry for themselves
  2. Give away their power
  3. Shy away from change
  4. Squander energy on things they can’t control
  5. Worry about pleasing everyone
  6. Fear taking risks
  7. Dwell on the past
  8. Repeat their mistakes
  9. Resent other people’s successes
  10. Give up after their first failure
  11. Fear “alone time”
  12. Feel the world owes them something
  13. Expect immediate results

I’m sure you will benefit from learning more about this important subject.

 

Headline in a Newspaper

The other day I read the following headline “Pressure on Apple for Its Next Big Thing.”  This headline reminded me of one of the key things I learned when I was consulting at a company in the midst of a turn-around attempt.  The simple lesson is that there is never a “Silver Bullet.”  The company I was working with got into deep financial trouble because they keep searching to the one product that would save the business.  In fact they already had an excellent product offering that they could not reliably and consistently deliver.  One by one their retail customer base stopped ordering from them.

You may be thinking that their silver bullet was fixing their fulfillment process.  Their inability to fulfill orders was a result of several factors including poor inventory control, poor bookkeeping and a lack of sales analysis, to name just a few.  One of the main messages of the ActionCOACH 5 Way Formula – Business Chassis is that your business can achieve massive results if you cover your bases and grow your business in balance.

My colleagues and I will be happy to work with you to implement any of the concepts mentioned in the blog.

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Being an Owner, Business Coaching, Success

Jimmy Walker has not had an easy road to success on the PGA Tour.  He won his first tour event at 34 years of age, after going 0 for 187 during his first seven seasons on tour.  During the last two PGA Tour seasons he has won five times.  That is quite a turnaround.  So what does his success playing golf at the highest level over the last two seasons have to do with your business Mr. Business Owner?

Like you, Jimmy Walker opened his business, he opened by turning pro, you opened by asking customers to pay you for your product or service.  He had some initial success, making his way onto the PGA Tour via the Tour’s Q-School, making some tournament cuts and earning some prize money.  Your business has provided you with some income and perhaps some personal stability and quality of life.

Jimmy has had some OK seasons and some not so OK seasons.  At one point his wife considered going back to work because Jimmy’s business was running at a loss and they were close to running out of money.  The low point of his tour career was in the 2009 season when he sunk to 125th on the money list.  You may have had some ups and downs in your business.  You may have had some losing years.  And you too may have been close to running out of cash.  After all, very few businesses take off like a rocket, earning consistent growth and profit year after year.  In addition, many businesses initially grow and then level off, seemingly stall.

So what did Jimmy do to achieve the success he has had during the last two seasons?

“About four years ago I made a shift in the way I do things.  I was tired of finishing 125th in money.  I was working hard but working on the wrong things and I wanted to figure out what to change, how to put different people in place to help me get better.” – Jimmy Walker in an interview in the November 2015 edition of Golf Magazine.

Jimmy knows he has the talent to succeed.  He also realizes that to maximize his talent he needs to have the right team in place.  If you have been in business for more than a few months and are making a profit in addition to paying yourself a salary, then it is safe to assume that you have the talent succeed.  Or maybe your business is just bumping along, barely profitable or merely breaking even.  In either situation, the questions you should ask yourself are:

  • Am I working hard on the wrong things?
  • Do I have the right extended team helping me maximize my talents?

If you answered YES to the first question or NO to the second question, you owe it to yourself to contact me or any of my ActionCOACH colleagues.  We will be happy to assist you in reversing those answers and maximizing your results.

Remember the definition of insanity –
Doing the same thing and expecting different results
Don’t Be Insane!

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Business Fundamentals, Communication, Leadership, Success

I was recently reading a great article in Success Magazine by Shelley Levitt about difficult, delicate and distasteful conversations.  Several of the points in the article bear repeating with emphasis.  But first some background.  Many managers, leaders or entrepreneurs work very hard at avoiding these kinds of conversations.   This is a big mistake for a couple of reasons:

  1. As we say in many of our ActionCOACH presentations, the earth is round. Therefore, ignored issues and problems sooner or later come around and bite you in the butt.
  2. And ignored issues usually grow in severity the longer they are not addressed.

In the best-seller Difficult Conversations: How to Address What Matters Most by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton and Sheila Heen the authors make the point that leaders and companies that can adroitly confront what matters most, “will leave their competition in the dust.”  And a note to those of you who have risen to a level of leadership that requires you to begin to have difficult conversations; you cannot get promoted past having to have distasteful conversations, the opposite is true.  In fact inability to handle these conversations is one of the most common reasons people don’t succeed according to Heen.

Here are a few suggestions for having successful professional conversations:

  • Be courageous. These conversations take courage, and there is no perfect time.
  • Be proactive. Don’t wait until an issue gets too big to be corrected.  Most of the time it is much more productive to make small incremental adjustments rather than having to correct major problems.
  • Plan the conversation. Pick an appropriate venue.  Avoid a spontaneous delivery fueled by anger or frustration.
  • Be direct and clear. Do not talk in tangents.
  • Be specific. Avoid generalizations.  “You were late returning from lunch three times last week” is much better than “you always come back from lunch late.”
  • Discuss Consequences Not Intentions. “When you are late with KPIs that causes many other delays” not “It seems you don’t think that on-time KPIs are important.”
  • No Buts. “Your suggestion to improve operations is great, but you need to design the next level of details” sounds critical, shutting down creativity, while “Your suggestion to improve operations is great, and you need to design the next level of details.” Is much more likely to open a productive dialogue.
  • Two Ears, One Mouth. Shut down your inner voice and simply listen.  “Listening is the most persuasive weapon” says Heen.

If you wish to get even better at difficult conversations and to accelerate your timeline to success, my colleagues and I at ActionCOACH would be happy to have a complementary, no obligation coaching session with you to better determine how much value we can add to your business.  Simply click the Free Business Coaching Session button near the top right of the screen.

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Business Coaching, Business Fundamentals, Consistency, Culture, Leadership, Mindset, Mission, Success, Total Product DEfinition

While reading the September 14, 2015 edition of Crain’s New York Business” I was energized by some of the advice given by almost all of the 2015 inductees to the Crain’s Hall of Fame.  Following are a few of the best quotes along with commentary relating the quotes to my philosophy of business.

First up are a couple of quotes from Larry Fink, the founder of Blackrock, the world’s largest investment firm.  Blackrock has more than $4.7 trillion under management.  He said “I’m a student of the markets.  If you stop being a student, you will fail.”  This takes our often mentioned phrase “you’ve got to learn to earn” to a whole other level by stating the consequence of stopping your learning … failure.  He goes on to say “I tell my leaders – my leaders are going to be teachers – if you’re a teacher who stopped being a student, you can’t be a good teacher.”  I’ve always said the one of the best ways to learn a subject is to teach it.

From Shelly Lazarus, former CEO and Chairman of Ogilvy & Mather we get several great pointers.  “You need to have a team that believes in you and people who believe in each other and people who can work together.  Without the people around you, you are never going to be successful.”  This speaks to the idea that true success in bound up with accomplishing a broader impactful mission, a mission that you can’t accomplish alone.  She goes on to say “It surprises me over and over how people don’t realize that you have to treat the people on your team respectfully; you have to let them share in the problem and the solution. You’re only going to be as good as the people who want to work with you.” (Emphasis added)  “Who want to work with you” … that’s the operative phrase.  Not easy, but essential to lasting success.

Pamela Brier, current President and CEO of Maimonides Medical Center, said something simple but very, very profound “It takes more than medical care to make healthy people.”  This speaks to the point of my previous blog “What is Your Product or Service?” where I discuss the total definition of a product or service.  Later in her interview she highlights the concept of inclusive management “…includes the notion that people close to the work not only have a stake in making a place work better, they also know a lot.  Tell me that who mops the floor in a patient’s room doesn’t know a lot about what’s going on with that patient and the family.”  Finally, she says “There is nothing inherently politically incorrect about being a tough-minded manager who does what you have to do to give an institution the financial wherewithal to do good work.”  You must continually achieve your mission to have impact.  In order to do that long term, the financial foundation has to be strong.

Emily Rafferty, the retired president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art talks about timing and personal being.  “Timing is everything, and if we make a mistake, often it is about not getting the timing right.  When you get it right, it lets us soar.  That’s what makes the difference, I think.  Our timing has to be right within ourselves and within our personal growth before it can work in the workplace or anywhere else.”  A prerequisite to success is preparing for success, BE + DO = HAVE.  Acquire the being of success in order to do what you need to do to achieve success to have success.

One of the primary purposes of coaching, whether business coaching or other forms of coaching, is to increasing the clients being.  My colleagues at ActionCOACH and I can work with you to increase your being.

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